Best winter vacations US

Sfurncoti River Trail

STRENUOUS

SUPERIOR NATIONAL FOREST LAURENTIAN RANGER DISTRICT

LENGTH 8.1 miles TIME 4:30 DIFFICULTY Strenuous ROUTE-FINDING Difficult

MAPS & PERMITS

GETTING THERE

TRAILHEAD GPS

An information sheet with map is available from the Laurentian District office in Aurora, Country. USGS quad: Dewey Lake NW.

No permit is required.

From Chisholm, drive north on Country State Highway 73 to County Road 65 and turn left. Go about 1.25 miles to the trailhead parking area on the right just prior to crossing the Sturgeon River.

47″ 40′ 29.0 N 92° 53′ 44.5″ W

This 8.1 mile hike utilizes a part of the 20-mile Sturgeon River Trail system that lies to the north and south of County Road 65. This hike circles a portion of the Sturgeon River, one of the larger rivers in St. Louis County. From its headwaters at Sturgeon Lake and a vast wetland area northeast of Chisholm, this river flows north to the Little Fork River, a tributary of Rainy River. Ultimately the waters of the Sturgeon River flow into Hudson Bay.

The route crosses a variety of terrain from river banks to steep ridges. It wanders through stands of mature red pines, dense growths of deciduous trees along the river’s edge, recent clearcuts, and grassy openings. Along much of the route, the evidence of clearcutting is quite obvious.

Triangular Trade In a very common triangular route, colonial ships carried rum and iron from New England to Africa. Best winter vacations US Once in Africa, the cargo was traded for slaves and gold, which were then shipped to the British-held West Indies, where they were traded for sugar and molasses. Finally, the sugar and molasses were shipped to New England and made into rum, and the process started all over again. A second frequent route involved the shipping of colonial grain and lumber to the West Indies, where they were traded for sugar, molasses, and fruit. These goods were then taken to England and traded for manufactured items, which would be shipped to New England. On occasion, however, colonists strayed from governmental mandates and engaged in smuggling. According to British trade laws, for example, colonists were to buy sugar and molasses only from the West Indies. The demand for these items was so great, however, that colonial merchants sometimes illegally purchased them from the French, Dutch, and Spanish.

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