Language In Puerto Rico

Being able to communicate is an integral part to getting around and enjoying Puerto Rico. Puerto
Ricans use both English and Spanish, but Spanish is the most dominant language in the territory. In
tourism and hospitality-related establishments, it is easy to find English-speaking Puerto Ricans,
while others who live far from the metro can manage basic English.
As a guest, locals appreciate it if you can learn and speak to them even in basic Spanish.

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It must be
noted though Puerto Rican Spanish is spoken faster than Mexicans and Central Americans while it has
distinct sound from the Cuban Spanish.

Here the current is very noticeable and more care should be taken, especially on the flood tide.

There is no movement of water whatsoever in this position on the bottom half of the ebb tide. It is also possible to dive on the bottom part of the flood tide, while the four rocks of the Frying Pan Shank of the Knavestone are still above water. These are a string the rocks that dry on a low tide and are situated on the northwestern side, linking up to form the reef resembling a pan handle.

An excellent dive in a gradually-sloping gully to 10 metres, which is full of wreckage from the steamer Horley, including steel prop shafts, winches, huge pipes, plating, framework and anchors. At the eastern entrance to the gully is a rusting ship’s boiler, now split open and exposing lots of pipes, including some copper ones, and the boiler often has one or two large resident ‘beetles’ in it. Last season, one diver from a London club discovered what he thought was a wooden box full of large brass shell casings: they turned out to be anti-personnel mines and were still filled with cordite.

That was a very dodgy find. Every year the northerly gales rip up the debris that litter the gully floor to expose new artefacts. The force of water is so strong that even the heaviest items like the huge prop shafts get thrown about like toys, so it is little wonder that ships coming ashore on the Knavestone seldom stay in one piece very long.

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