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Carowinds is a run-of-the-mill amusement park with all of the flashing lights, loud noises, carnival games, and junk food that can be expected. The park covers 112 acres with more than 50 rides, shows, and attractions. There are 12 roller coasters in the park, making it one of the largest coaster collections in the Southeast. Carowinds also has a water park that is a huge draw when skyrocketing temperatures and unbearable humidity hit during the summer months.

RAY’S SPLASH PLANET

215 N. Sycamore St., 704/432-4729, www.charmeck. org

HOURS: Sept.-May Mon.-Fri. 9 A.M.-8 P.M., Sat. 9 A.M.-7 P.M., Sun. 1-7 P.M.; June-Aug. Mon.-Fri. 9 A.M.-9 P.M., Sat. 9 A.M.-7 P.M., Sun. 1-7 P.M.

COST: $11 adults, $8 seniors (62+), $6 children under 17; discounts available for Mecklenburg County residents Map 1

It’s hard to find space for a giant water park within the city limits, so Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation partnered with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to build Ray’s Splash Planet on the campus of Irwin Avenue Open Elementary School. It opened in 2002 as North Carolina’s first indoor water park with a three-story waterslide, lazy river, quick-current pool called The Vbrtex, a water playground with multiple pools, and two lap lanes for swimming, water basketball, or water volleyball. In addition to the 117,000-gallon water park, Ray’s Splash Planet has a playground, basketball court, horseshoe pits, a fitness center, and concessions.

1721 The first music textbook printed in North Country, A Very Plain and Easy Introduction to the Whole Art of Singing Psalm Tunes, is published in Massachusetts by Reverend John Tufts. Moscow Map By 1682, with those who could read music firmly in the minority, the practice of psalm singing in the colonies lacked even a modicum of regularity and had become, in many places, a cacophonous, ear-splitting din. Tufts’s Introduction, it is hoped, will restore a degree of musical literacy to the colonies; the textbook also is intended to put an end to the musical butchery caused by lining out. This system of psalm singing is described by Thomas L. Purvis in Colonial Country to 1763 as that by which a precentor who [is] typically a church elder, [sings] a psalm line by line, with pauses in between each that [allow] the congregation to repeat the stanza in his meter and melody.

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