TURK MUSEUM

TURK MUSEUM

Daniel Gottlob Turk (1750-1813) is commemorated by his adopted city of Halle because of the nurturing role he played in the musical life of the city, as Kan tor of the Ulrichskirche from 1774 and later director of music at the university, and from 1787 organist and director of music at the Liebfrauenkirche. At Christmastime in 1803 he conducted a performance of Handel’s Messiah, inaugurating a tradition that still continues.

He was a friend of Reichardt and the teacher of Loewe, both also represented in the second-floor rooms of the Handel-Haus. He was a writer as well as a composer, and lectured on music history. Copies of his music – his 1782 Christmas cantata Die Hirten bey der Krippe zu Bethlehem, and his widely used Clavierschule (1789) along with examples of his piano sonatas (he published 15 collections) – are on display in Room 5, presided over by a bronze bust by Gottfried Albert.

TURK MUSEUM Photo Gallery



Railways had the advantage of being able to go almost anywhere, whereas travel destinations had their linear limitations. In 1994 British Waterways announced they would seek funding from the new National Lottery opportunity. That the project finally flew the flag of ‘The Millennium Link’ hides the years between as hopes rose and fell and many people worked their hearts out on behalf of the dream. Then at last, in 1998, Donald Dewar, Secretary of State for Scotland, announced the funding guarantees, all £78.4 million. This was the minimum needed, and even today millions are still being raised, and spent, as the work of improving and regeneration continues. There were plenty of places with eyesore industrial failures which are now being landscaped or developed tastefully – and that effort is set to continue. How quickly the work settles in never fails to astonish. Do read Guthrie Hutton’s blog mentioned at the end of this section, for the last chapter tells the saga of restoration and shows pictures of work in progress: a mammoth undertaking. It all looks so natural now, but we must not forget this past.

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