Visit The Denver Art Museum

MILE-HIGH ‘MOON On the last day of your road trip, visit the Denver Art Museum, with architecture inspired by the geology of the Rockies.

Chow down the Damn Near Half a Maine Lobster roll at Stoic & Genuine, the new seafood restaurant from James Beard award-winning chef Jennifer Jasinski, located at the newly renovated Beaux-Arts Union Station, appropriately housed in a former train station.

You're exiting the honeymoon highway at offi cial newlywed status, but the true adventure is just beginning.

Life was really hard and everyone lost weight through sweat and the miserable damp jungle conditions. We relished any break from patrol duties, so on return to HQ in Kuala Lumpur, with the opportunity to take time off, I would head for the lovely tropical beach resort at Port Dickson on the Straits of Malacca, a place also very popular with local people.

Visit The Denver Art Museum Photo Gallery

Click on Photos for Next Visit The Denver Art Museum Gallery Images



It was there that I discovered a different and fascinating new world, away from the biting creepy crawlies of the jungle. The wide sandy beaches below the high water mark swarmed with countless millions of little red fiddler crabs. If anyone approached, the whole beach seemed to move, as the mass of tiny crabs darted in unison to the safety of their sandy burrows while waving their relatively large single claws menacingly towards the sky. At the southern end of the beach, around the headland and separating it from a beautiful blue lagoon, a small mangrove forest jutted out into the shallow green-blue sea. Here, the muddy bottom among the mangrove roots was a kindergarten for multitudes of young fish of every description. The overhanging branches in the mangrove were lined with dozens of brilliant metallic-green and brown-and-white kingfishers that were always on the lookout for an easy meal. When the tide receded, hundreds of quaint little mudskippers emerged from the salty pools to search for insects and the invertebrates that swarmed over the oozy, muddy surface. By flexing their hind end they could move by giving a little skipping jump and the specially-adapted pectoral fin ‘fingers' enabled them to waddle over the mud.

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