Fuzhou Travel

When the first rays of sun touch the temple doorsill, Fuzhou Travel the formal meditation period ends. Outside on the Holy Road, sannyasis (novice monks) Fuzhou Travel hurried to the wells with water buckets slung on their shoulder yokes. Most carriers were humming and singing to themselves, and the birds set up a riotous dawn chorus. The early pilgrims on the Holy Road were mostly Tibetan families, men in black velvet coats lined with lambswool; women in long padded coats of red and black, tied around the waist with rather grubby sashes from which hung an assortment of silver pendants. Their hair, in the customary plaits, was caught together at the back with silver loops and embroidery. I followed a pilgrim family into a temple since they seemed to know which doors to go through.

In the twenty-first century, a new form of globalized urbanization is occurring, creating a different set of sonic urban conditions even though transport and communication technologies of the early twentieth century remain present. The resulting transformations in the contemporary city are characterized by new spaces, events, and relationships, including encounters with different sensory environments and experience of place.

One hundred years after Russolo, two Japanese sound artists, Yasuhiko HAMACHI and Yukihisa NAKASE (known collectively as Rogues’ Gallery), continue the fascination with the sonic experience of urban technologies and spaces. Driving a 1991 Citroen XM-X, containing specialized audio equipment designed to amplify engine and general car noise, Rogues’ Gallery create a site-specific kinaesthetic experience of travelling in a car in their performance work Gasoline Music and Cruising (1994-ongoing). Not only do they offer an exhilarating, immersive and affective encounter with sound, machine and space but Rogues’ Gallery also create a new way to think about locative experiences of place.

Figure 1: Rogues’ Gallery performance, Osaka, October 2011. Image: Kristen Sharp.

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